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Appleton Inspired Speaker
Series features conservationist
and shark buff Jim Abernathy

Shark Faces Man  HardisonInk.com
 Jim Abernathy gets up close and personal with a shark during a cage-free dive.

Photo Provided by Appleton Museum of Art

Published July 13, 2018 at 8:08 a.m
     OCALA --
The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, continues the monthly Inspired Speakers Series with Jim Abernathy on Sunday, Aug. 12, at 2 p.m.


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     These monthly presentations feature individuals who not only excel in their fields but are also an inspiration to others.
     Abernathy is an award-winning author, photographer, cinematographer and conservationist who pioneered shark encounters without a cage. Starting at a young age, scuba diving served as an inspiration for his life’s mission as a conservationist. For decades, he has been leading photography/videography expeditions to engage with the world’s largest predatory sharks.
      Abernathy hosts cage-free dive expeditions day and night with tiger, great hammerheads, oceanic white tips, bull, and lemon sharks and he is best known as an extremely passionate crusader for their protection.
     He has received numerous awards for his lifelong dedication as a marine life conservationist. His relentless efforts around conservation have resulted in the creation of two nonprofits WildlifeVOICE and Operation Blue Pride.
     His award-winning marine life images are often featured in the world’s top nature magazines. Additionally, Abernathy’s expedition clients include many of the world’s top nature filmmakers and magazines such as Imax, National Geographic, BBC Wildlife, Animal Planet and Discovery Channel.
     In addition to being a talented photographer, he has authored several books featuring his stunning photographs: Sea Turtles – Up Close, Sharks – Up Close and The Secret of Pig Island. These books will be available for purchase in the Appleton Store, and a book-signing with Abernathy will follow the talk.
      Tickets are free for Appleton members and College of Central Florida students; $10 for nonmembers. Advance reservation or purchase is recommended at AppletonMuseum.org or by calling Griselle Gonzalez at 352-291-4455, ext. 1836.
     Owned and operated by the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on State Road 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit http://appletonmuseum.org/.


Ways to travel
with cremated remains



By Bob Burns, TSA Social Media
Published July 11, 2018 at 8:38 a.m.
     WASHINGTON, D.C. --
You may have seen a story in the news recently about a traveler finding his mother’s cremains spilled in his checked bag at LAX (Los Angeles International Airport).




Photo provided by TSA.

     We understand how painful losing a loved one is, and we express our sincere condolences. It’s terrible that he had to discover this, and we can’t fathom the emotions this would induce.
In an effort to prevent this from happening to anybody else, we’d like to explain what happened and offer some guidance on traveling with cremains.
     We immediately looked into the matter, and upon video review, we learned that the checked bag alarmed for an unidentified object. Upon opening the bag for inspection, a TSA officer discovered that the object was an opened, unmarked ceramic container that was loosely wrapped in aluminum foil. Due to the lack of markings, the officer did not know that the contents were cremains. The container was carefully repacked and the bag was cleared to continue to its destination.
     Travelers are allowed to travel with cremains in a checked bag, however it is recommended to do so in a carry-on bag to help protect the contents from the risks associated with checked baggage. Checked bags are subjected to rapid and sometimes rough movement along a series of conveyor belts as they make the trek to and from the aircraft. A little known fact is that checked bags are only in TSA’s possession for a fraction of their journey to the aircraft.
     TSA has a clear process for screening crematory remains. Our officers routinely conduct these types of screenings throughout our nation’s airports. Crematory remains in carry-on must pass through the X-ray machine to be screened. If the X-ray operator cannot clear the remains, TSA may apply other, non-intrusive means of resolving the alarm. If the officer cannot determine that the container does not contain a prohibited item, the remains will not be permitted.
     We understand the emotional stress passengers may be under when transporting the remains of a loved one. Our guidelines for traveling with crematory remains are not intended to make this already emotionally difficult process more complex than needed. However, crematory remains are one of the many sensitive items that could be exploited by someone wanting to conceal a dangerous item. TSA officers are trained to treat all travelers’ belongings with care and respect and will not open containers with cremated remains, even if the passenger requests this be done.
     We have a team of TSA employees who are ready to answer your questions via Twitter at @AskTSA or via Facebook Messenger. They look forward to answering your questions 365 days a year from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. Eastern Time daily. You may also reach our contact center by email or by phone at 866-289-9673. Federal Relay: 711
     Some airlines do not allow crematory remains in checked baggage, so check with your airline first.


Appleton Inspired Speaker
Series features guitar greats
Howard Paul and
Robert Benedetto on July 29


Howard Paul (left) and Robert Benedetto (right) with Pat Martino.
Story and Photos Provided
Published July 4, 2018 at 5:18 p.m.

 
     OCALA — The Appleton Museum of Art, College of Central Florida, continues the monthly Inspired Speakers Series with Howard Paul and Robert Benedetto on July 29 at 2 p.m.




1991 Desert Storm, Saudi Arabia, Howard Paul (right) is promoted to captain and is seen here with Brig. Gen. Gary Whaley.

     These monthly presentations feature individuals who not only excel in their fields, but also are an inspiration to others. 
     From jazz guitarist to Army officer to corporate executive, Howard Paul is a man of many talents.
     A gifted musician and business leader, for years he has maintained dual careers in music and business. In 2006, he was named president/CEO of Benedetto Guitars in Savannah, Ga. — a position he inherited from Robert Benedetto and still holds today.
     Paul will discuss and demonstrate how guitars create sound, how the ear perceives those sounds, and how the innovative construction of Benedetto guitars creates specific tones and resonance. After the talk, Paul will be joined onstage by Robert Benedetto for a question-and-answer session.
     Robert Benedetto is world-renowned and widely acknowledged as today’s foremost maker of archtop guitars, whose sound is particularly popular with jazz, blues, rockabilly and psychobilly guitarists.
     Over a prolific 47-year career, he has personally handcrafted nearly 1,000 instruments, including 500 archtops.
     Paul notes that, “Bob’s unparalleled career has impacted the entire industry, and raised the bar for luthiers, manufacturers and players alike. His 47 years of experience, experimentation and collaboration with the greatest players of their day, and willingness to share his secrets and know-how can be heard and felt in every Benedetto guitar made today, as they reflect Benedetto’s character and talent.”
     Don’t miss this unique opportunity to learn more about guitars and acoustics from two incredibly passionate and knowledgeable people in the music industry. 
     Tickets are free for Appleton members and College of Central Florida students; $10 for nonmembers. Advance reservation or purchase is recommended at AppletonMuseum.org or by calling Griselle Gonzalez at 352-291-4455, ext. 1836.
     Owned and operated by the College of Central Florida, the Appleton Museum of Art is located at 4333 E. Silver Springs Blvd., Ocala, east of downtown on SR 40 (exit 352 east off I-75 or exit 268 west off I-95). Parking is free. For more information, call 352-291-4455 or visit http://appletonmuseum.org/.


FWC conducts aquatic
plant control on Lake Rousseau
July 9-20, weather permitting


FWC photo by Karen Parker

Published July 3, 2018 at 1:48 p.m.
     LAKE CITY --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is scheduled to conduct aquatic plant control on Lake Rousseau from July 9 through July 20, weather permitting.
     Lake Rousseau is part of the Withlacoochee River and is in parts of Citrus, Levy and Marion counties, west of Dunnellon.
     Invasive hydrilla will be treated only in boat trails, but water lettuce and water hyacinth will be treated throughout the lake.
     Boat trails requiring hydrilla treatment to maintain navigation include County Trails B & C, Lighthouse Cove and Buddy’s Trail.
     Biologists anticipate treating approximately 131 acres of hydrilla and 50 acres of water lettuce and water hyacinth with herbicides approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
     “There will be no restrictions on recreational activities, such as fishing or swimming, during the treatment period,” said Bruce Jaggers, an FWC invasive plant management biologist. “Any edible fish caught that are legal to keep may be consumed.” 
     There is a seven-day restriction on using water from treated areas for drinking or for animal consumption. However, there are no restrictions for other uses of treated water such as irrigating turf, ornamental plants and crops.
     Hydrilla is an invasive aquatic plant spread easily by boats throughout Florida’s lakes and rivers. While recreational anglers and waterfowl hunters may see some benefits from hydrilla, there are other potential impacts to consider including negative impacts to beneficial native habitat, navigation, flood control, potable and irrigation water supplies, recreation and the aesthetic qualities of lakes. The FWC strives to balance these needs while managing hydrilla.
     Go to MyFWC.com/WildlifeHabitats and click on “Invasive Plants” to find out more about invasive plant management, including “Frequently Asked Questions.”
     For more information, contact Bruce Jaggers at 352-726-8622.

 


 

FWC offers hunter safety
Internet-completion courses
offered in August

FWC photo published in HardisonInk.com
Photo Provided By FWC

Published July 3, 2018 at 8:48 a.m.
     LAKE CITY --
The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) is offering free hunter safety Internet-completion courses in eight counties during August (listed below).
Students who have taken the online course and wish to complete the classroom portion must bring the online-completion report with them.
     All firearms, ammunition and materials are provided free of charge. Students should bring a pen or pencil and paper. An adult must accompany children younger than 16 at all times.
     Anyone born on or after June 1, 1975, must pass an approved hunter safety course and have a hunting license to hunt alone (unsupervised). The FWC course satisfies hunter-safety training requirements for all other states and Canadian provinces.
     The counties, dates and times are:
Alachua County
Aug. 4 (8 a.m. until complete)
Gainesville
~
Aug. 18 (8 a.m. until complete)
Gainesville
~
Baker County
Aug. 25 (8 a.m. until noon) Macclenny and (1 p.m. until complete) Lake City
~                                                   
Clay County
Aug. 9 (6 to 9 p.m.) Orange Park and Aug. 11 (8 a.m. until complete) Graham
~
Aug. 23 (6 to 9 p.m.) Keystone Heights and Aug. 25 (8 a.m. until complete) Graham
~
Columbia County
Aug. 25 (8 a.m. until complete)
Lake City
~
Duval County
Aug. 23 (6 to 9 p.m.) and Aug. 25 (8:30 a.m. until noon)
Jacksonville
~
Lafayette County
Aug. 18 (8 a.m. until complete) Mayo
~
Levy County
Aug. 12 (2 p.m. until complete) Chiefland
~
Aug. 26 (3 to 7 p.m.) Williston

~
Madison County
Aug. 18 (noon until complete) Madison
~
     The specific locations for these classes will be given to those who register in advance. Those interested in attending a course can register online and obtain information about future hunter safety classes at http://myfwc.com/HunterSafety or by calling the FWC’s Regional Office in Lake City at 386-758-0525.



Column and Photo
By Myrtice Scabarozi © July 2, 2018 at 4:08 p.m.
     LEVY COUNTY –
The Log Cabin Quilters met Thursday (June 28) at the Levy County Quilt Museum -- 11050 N.W. 10th Ave. (near Levyville, kind of on the way to Judson on Levy County Road 134 from U.S. Alt. 27).
     Ellen worked on her crocheted blanket that will go to a Veteran. When we get in yarn, we share it with individuals at Ellzey United Methodist Church who make hats for cancer patients, and Ellen and others who make small quilts for the patients at the VA hospital in Gainesville. Evelyn left her quilt project at home so we assembled a Dresden plate pillow top to be quilted.
     Judy brought in several small quilts that can go into Evelyn’s projects pile. Thanks Judy.
     The adult male inmates from Lancaster Correctional Institution were out this week. They were busy getting the yard trimmed. The rain keeps them busy as everything is growing really fast.
     Saturday (July 7), the Backyard Pickers will be with us. They’re inside where it’s cool and dry.
     The Levy County Quilt Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.


log cabin quilters HardisonInk.com   Levy County
Ellen enjoys being able to spread out her work and has lots of light. She's completed the panels and now need to stitch them together.


Evelyn's busy with the Dresden Plate pillow top.

 


Sons of Confederate Veterans
meet in Cross City

By Commander Daryl Ratterree of the SCV Dixie Defenders Camp 2086, Cross City
(also Florida Division 5th Lieutenant Commander)
Photos by Betty Jones Mikell of the United Daughters of the Confederacy-Suwannee River Chapter #2715, Chiefland
Published July 2, 2018 at 4:08 p.m.

     CROSS CITY --
The Sons of Confederate Veterans, Camp 2086 - "The Dixie Defenders" held their monthly meeting in the Dixie County Library in Cross City on Tuesday, June 26.


Daryl Ratterree, Commander Dixie Defenders Camp #2086 and Lieutenant Commander, Central Region, Florida Division.


(from left) Robert Yancy, Treasurer; Jim Tucker, Adjutant; Commander Daryl Ratterree; Gary Poore, 2nd Lieutenant Commander; J. Ferrell Mikell, 1st Lieutenant Commander.


(from left) Kelly Barrow, Past National Commander-In-Chief;  Tarry Beasley,  Judge Advocate General for the Florida Division and member of Private Milton Riley Camp #741 of Tavares. In the background are  Charles Hickman,  Major William Footman Camp #1950, Fort Myers, and Kelly Crocker, Florida Division Commander, Tallahassee.


     The guest speaker for this meeting was Charles Kelly Barrow. He is the 73rd Past National Commander-In-Chief for the Sons of Confederate Veterans. He served from 2014 to 2016 in this position.
     Barrow lives in Griffin, Ga.
     The members of SCV Camp #2086 were extremely proud to host him for this event.  The event was well-attended by SCV Camps and United Daughters of the Confederacy from across the State of Florida.
     Florida Division Commander Kelly Crocker also was an honored guest at this event. Division Commander Crocker is the Camp Commander for Finley's Brigade Camp #1614 in Tallahassee.
     The Dixie Defenders were also proud to have in attendance the following members from other camps:
     ● Tarry Beasley from the Private Milton Riley Camp #741 of Tavares. Beasley is also the Judge Advocate General for the Florida Division.
     ● 7th Brigade Commander Clement Lindsey who is also Camp Commander of the John Hance Osteen Camp #770 in Gilchrist County.
     ● 8th Brigade Commander Jerry Peacock, who is also a member of Camp #741.
     ● Charles Hickman, a member of Major William Footman Camp #1950 in Fort Myers.
     ● Adjutant William C. Wright and Richard Cane both from 2nd Lieutenant Joseph Morgan Camp # 2012 in Perry.
     ● Phil Waters who is Adjutant for Juda P. Benjamin Camp 2210 in Tampa.
     ● Sandy Mott and Judy Rainey from the United Daughters of the Confederacy-Marion Dragoons Chapter #2311, Ocala.
     ● Linda Baynard, (outgoing president) and Myrtice Scabarozi (incoming president), Betty Jones Mikell and Alicia Jenkins representing United Daughters of the Confederacy-Suwannee River Chapter #2715, Chiefland.
     ● James William Barrow III, from the Georgia Division-Children of the Confederacy.
     ● Jordyn and Jakob Jenkins from the Florida Division- Children of the Confederacy.  Jakob Jenkins is also a Cadet from the John Hance Osteen Camp #770.
     By the way, as Betty Jones Mikell mentioned, congratulations are in order for Commander Ratterree, the recipient of The Governor John Milton award, Florida Division, presented on June 2. He earned this distinction for loyalty and dedication above the call of duty. Only one of these awards is given each year.
     Also in attendance at this event on June 26, was Commander Clement Lindsey and 2nd Lieutenant Gary Poore who each also received the award in past years.
     The Sons of Confederate Veterans, Dixie Defenders Camp 2086 meets the Fourth Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. in the Dixie County Library Conference Room. This is a National Honor and Historical Society. The group does not tolerate racism in the organization. The goal is to educate and teach history in regard to the War Between the States (1861-1865).
     Individuals who are interested in learning about this history is invited to attend meetings. All are welcome.


Bay scallop season opened
July 1 in Franklin,
Northwest Taylor and
Levy, Citrus and Hernando


Scallop Dates
This map shows some scallop season facts.

By Amanda Nalley of the FWC
Published June 30, 2018 at 8:08 a.m.
Updated July 13, 2018 at 68:08 a.m.
     NORTH CENTRAL FLORIDA --
Starting July 1, state waters off the following areas will open to bay scallop harvest: Franklin through northwest Taylor County (including Carrabelle, Lanark and St. Marks) and Levy, Citrus and Hernando counties (including Cedar Key, Crystal River and Homosassa).




FWC Photo of scallops underwater


     These areas will remain open to harvest through Sept. 24.
     “Scalloping is a great way to enjoy Florida’s incredible waters and pristine beaches," Gov. Rick Scott said. "I encourage all Floridians to get outside and enjoy our world-class scallop season with family and friends.”
     "Scalloping with your friends and family is classic Florida fun in the sun," said Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) Chairman Bo Rivard. "The season brings people and an economic boost to these coastal areas, all the while encouraging conservation and connecting residents and visitors to the wonders of Florida's outdoors."
* Bag limits and other regulations
     Bag and vessel limits in open bay scallop harvest zones are 2 gallons whole bay scallops in shell or 1 pint of bay scallop meat per person, with a maximum of 10 gallons of whole bay scallops in shell or 1/2 gallon of bay scallop meat per vessel.
     Scallops may be collected by hand or with a landing or dip net.
     Scallops must be landed within areas that are open to harvest and may not be possessed on waters outside of areas that are open to harvest or during the closed season.
     There is no commercial harvest allowed for bay scallops in Florida.
     For information on bay scallop regulations, visit MyFWC.com/Fishing and click on “Saltwater Fishing,” “Recreational Regulations” and “Bay Scallops.”

Boater and scalloper safety
     Be safe when diving for scallops. Stay within 300 feet of a properly displayed divers-down flag or device when scalloping in open water, and within 100 feet of a properly displayed divers-down flag or device if on a river, inlet or navigation channel. Boat operators traveling within 300 feet of a divers-down flag or device in open water or within 100 feet of one on a river, inlet or navigational channel must slow to idle speed. For more information, visit MyFWC.com/Boating/Regulations and click on “Divers-down Warning Devices.” Always remember to properly stow divers-down devices when divers and snorkelers have exited the water.
Other best practices
     Snorkel with a buddy.
     Always have an observer on board the boat while others are scalloping.
     Do not discard scallop shells in inshore waters commonly used for recreational activities such as the Homosassa River or Crystal River. Piles of discarded scallop shells can create hazards for swimmers and damage seagrass habitat. Scallop shells can be discarded in a trash receptacle or in larger bodies of water where they are more likely to disperse.
     Be aware of changing tides.
     Stash your trash.
     Wear your personal flotation device when the boat is underway.

2018  Season Dates and Boundaries
     St. Joseph Bay and Gulf County: Aug. 17 – Sept. 30. This region includes all state waters from the Mexico Beach Canal in Bay County to the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County.
     Franklin through northwest Taylor County (including Carrabelle, Lanark and St. Marks): July 1 – Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters from the westernmost point of St. Vincent Island in Franklin County to Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County.
     The remaining portion of Taylor County and all of Dixie County (including Keaton Beach and the Steinhatchee area): June 16 – Sept. 10. This region includes all state waters east of Rock Island near the mouth of the Fenholloway River in Taylor County and north of Alligator Pass Daybeacon #4 near the mouth of the Suwannee River in Levy County.
     Levy, Citrus and Hernando counties (including Cedar Key, Crystal River and Homosassa): July 1 – Sept. 24. This region includes all state waters south of Alligator Pass Daybeacon #4 near the mouth of the Suwannee River in Levy County to the Hernando – Pasco county line.
     Pasco County: A trial 10-day open season will occur July 20-29. This region includes all state waters south of the Hernando – Pasco county line and north of the Anclote Key Lighthouse in northern Pinellas County, and includes all waters of the Anclote River.

 


Margaret Hiers donates
painting of the Octagon Building;

Other works shared
with world via HardisonInk.com

Margaret Hiers and Chiefland City Manager Mary Ellzey HardisonInk.com
Margaret Hiers stands by as City Manager Mary Ellzey reads her research concerning the history of the Octagon Building in Chiefland.

Story and Photos
By Jeff M. Hardison © June 26, 2018 at 11:18 p.m.
All Material Is Copyright Protected
     CHIEFLAND
– Margaret Hiers on Monday night (June 25) donated an oil painting she made of the Octagon Building in Chiefland, and she share the history of this – the first Chiefland City Hall.

Painting by Margaret Hiers of Chiefland  HardisonInk.com
The painting donated to Chiefland.

Painting by Margaret Hiers of Chiefland  HardisonInk.com
Standing with the painting are (from left) City Commissioner Teresa Barron, City Commissioner Rollin Hudson, Chiefland Mayor Betty Walker, artist Margaret Hiers, City Commissioner Donald Lawrence and Vice Mayor Chris Jones.

Painting by Margaret Hiers of Chiefland  HardisonInk.com
This is a patriotic painting by Margaret Hiers.

Painting by Margaret Hiers of Chiefland  HardisonInk.com
Another of the many lovely paintings by Margaret Hiers and shared with the world through HardisonInk.com is seen here.

Painting by Margaret Hiers of Chiefland  HardisonInk.com
This fawn (baby deer) with big eyes is so young it still has its spots. This is a painting by Margaret Hiers.


The historic Trenton Train Depot is captured on canvas by Margaret Hiers.


This Mustang is another of the many great works of art by Margaret Hiers.



     Later Monday night, she sent by email photos of five other paintings she completed to HardisonInk.com to share with the world, including one of the Trenton Train Depot.
     She has painted more than 80 pictures.
     As she made her presentation, Hiers told the City Commission that her ancestry runs deep in Levy County.
     Among her relatives were her great uncle Rollin Hudson, the great-grandfather of City Commissioner Rollin Hudson.
     “These citizens and others were instrumental in establishing the town of Chiefland,” she said.
     Her husband was the late John Delmar “Bud” Hiers Jr.
     Sylvia Hiers Emmons, one of their daughters, is the manager of the Gilchrist County Public Library Public Library in Trenton. Another daughter is Gilchrist County Court Judge Sheree Hiers Lancaster.
     “My passion is art,” Margaret Hiers said. “I love painting in oils, acrylics and pastels.”
     She painted the Octagon Building from her memory of it being in the city park before the other buildings were constructed around it.
     City Manager Mary Ellzey read the document the painter created.
     The octagon open-air structure was built, circa 1921, from hard yellow pine. It graced the center of Chiefland City Park.
     The original purpose of the building was a bandshell to be used by the Chiefland community, Ellzey said as she read the fact Hiers had found by her research.
     In 138, the bandshell was enclosed, creating a meeting and greeting hall. It then became Chiefland’s first City Hall.
     In 1959, Chiefland constructed a new City Hall because it had outgrown the building, Ellzey said as she read the document.
     The Octagon Building was moved to the Chiefland Cemetery where it was used by Boy Scouts and others for meetings. It fell into disrepair.
     The Chiefland Woman’s Club made it a project to restore the Octagon Building and return it to its home in Chiefland City Park, Ellzey said, to be used as a library. It opened in 1974 after being completely restored.
     In 1985, the Luther Callaway Public Library was constructed after the Octagon Building had been outgrown for that purpose. For a period of time, it was used as an office for the Greater Chiefland Area Chamber of Commerce.
     Although it is used now only for storage, it remains in Chiefland City Park as a reminder of Chiefland’s history.
     The late Etter Usher Sr. had donated the Chiefland City Park, Hiers said, and she lived across the street from that park when she was in third grade.
     She played there as a child, and she remembers the building sitting in the middle of the park – before the fire station, building department structure and police station had been placed around it.
     The only other structure in that park decades ago was a basketball court. There were trees, and that is why she put trees in the painting she donated to the city.
     Hiers said she would like to see that building used as a reading room, or perhaps as a place to display artifacts of Levy County.


People donate $22,341
to build memorial for officers


Photo by The Framed Hourglass by Beasley Photography copied from Facebook

By Shelbie Hutto
Finance Assistant
Gilchrist County Sheriff’s Office
Published June 26, 2018 at 2:38 p.m.
     TRENTON --
Saturday (June 23), was the Fallen Heroes Memorial Festival and Poker Run.

     Gilchrist County Sheriff’s Office Deputy Sheriff R. Whitaker and GCSO Deputy Sheriff G. Frier participated in the First Responder Doughnut Eating Contest and tied.
     There were numerous booths and games for the attendees to enjoy.
     There was also an auction, petting zoo, bounce houses, and a bike and car show. We also had over 200 riders in the Poker Run. $22,341 was raised through the festival and poker run.
     This money will go toward the construction of a memorial for one sheriff, one constable and two GCSO deputies who died in the line of duty in Gilchrist County since the county was founded in 1925.
     The outpouring of support from our county was amazing. Thank you to everyone who donated their time, money, and effort into making this a huge success. You are all so appreciated.
     We are very thankful to live and serve in Gilchrist County. Also, a huge thank you to The Framed Hourglass by Beasley Photography for taking pictures.

--UPDATED--
TUESDAY  JULY 17  7:08 a.m.
Levy, Dixie and Gilchrist counties







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